POTS Syndrome

POTS syndrome is also known as postural orthostatic tachycardia. It is one of a group of disorders which have orthostatic tolerance (OI) as their primary symptom. Orthostatic intolerance describes a condition in which an excessively reduced volume of blood returns to the heart after an individual stands up from a lying down position, fainting. [https://www.inlifehealthcare.com]

Symptoms Include:
Fainting
Heart palpitations
Shaking & sweating
Weakness & fatigue
Dizziness or light-headedness
Headaches
Poor sleep
Chest pain
Feeling sick
Shortness of breath

3 Types of POTS

Neuropathic POTS
Hyperadrenergic POTS
Secondary POTS
Neuropathic POTS
This is essentially nerve disease. Here, the sympathetic nerve supply to lower limbs does not function properly and so there is pooling of the blood in the lower extremities rather than being returned back up to the heart. This leads to dizziness on standing and an increase in heart rate. This is the most common form of POTS.

Hyperadrenergic POTS
This is a case of high adrenaline. These patients have high levels of norepinephrine in their blood. This leads to increased heart-rate and blood pressure. While neuropathic POTS has lower blood pressure and higher heart rate when standing, hyperadrenergic POTS typically has both increased blood pressure and heart rate when standing.

Secondary POTS
This refers to POTS syndrome that is a result of another under-lying condition that leads to damage of the nerves that usually control the re-distribution of blood. These under-lying conditions can include diabetes, lupus, alcoholism and chemo. [https://myheart.net/pots-syndrome/types/]

Some Spoonies Worst Symptoms and Some Advice:

Stephanie shares: “Right now, I’m struggling most with temperature regulation and sweating. I’m always getting hot and cold at the same time! And I get so fatigued from standing it’s crazy!”

Adara shares: “I can’t stay standing for very long due to dizziness, drop in bp, heart rate and lips going blue. Hands and feet go red and purple and I get brain fog and fatigue. I use a wheel chair now. (I was once a badminton player) I was diagnosed after ten years- took a print our of POTs information to my doctor.”

Adara gives some advice to POTs patients: “Drink lots of water and salt (always carry emergency salty snacks, the way diabetics carry sweet stuff). Wear compression socks, stay cool, use a shower stool/seat and if you want to try physiotherapy/medication, then ask loudly and don’t be given no for an answer.”

A Brief Tale of Kristie’s POTS Experience:
I “spoke” to Kristie Johnson, of Migraine Mantras (Migraine Mantras), via Facebook messenger. She’s been dealing with POTS for eight years now, before doctor’s finally began looking into it and was finally diagnosed two years ago with it.
When I spoke to her about her most aggravating symptom’s she told me this:

“I have the most trouble with blood pressure drops. I get up slower, turn slower, anything I can do to avoid passing out. Gatorade and body armor are the only thing helping me right now. I know when I’m about to pass out, 90% of the time (ringing ears, dizzy, blurred vision or blacked out vision) and can sit or lay down before it happens. Sometimes I can’t catch myself. I’ve fallen down the stairs, fallen into things, washer, a dresser, etc.

When talking about her symptoms, length of time she’s been struggling with her symptoms and her recent diagnostics, she told me:

“Local docs won’t treat me, and I’m actually being sent to a hospital a few hours away to see an autonomic specialist for treatment. It’s 3-ish hours away in a Medical Center in Norwalk and I’m on disability so money isn’t something I have a lot of.”

I also asked her which POTS she was struggling with.

“Reading into it I mostly fir into the Secondary POTS category because I have under lying issues like Lupus and nerve damage.”

Sharing Stories Brings Awareness

Like so many others, Kristie is struggling with POTS and it is my hope, that through the sharing of these and so many other stories, we will bring more awareness to POTS and other chronic illness, to those who do not know or do not understand enough about them. We have begun to learn, the impact our voices have. I encourage everyone to share their story with people everywhere, because you don’t know whose life you will touch. When we are silent, we often feel we are alone. When talk and share these stories, we are suddenly catapulted into a community who can listen and support us.

As always, thank you for reading. Thank you for supporting my blog.
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I recently hit 1000 followers on Twitter and I want to say thank you to all my followers there who support me. If you’d like to follow me my handle is: @fibrohippiechic and you can follow me on Instagram: @lovekarmafood
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