COVID Sucks & Some Tips to Fight It

On December 16th, I was diagnosed with COVID-19. Almost 20 days later and I’m still feeling the symptoms of the illness. I have not gone to get tested yet because up until a week ago I was still running a temperature of 101.5. I figure if my eldest, who was positive with no symptoms only just now tested negative after two weeks, I’m likely not negative yet having active symptoms up until a week ago although I know you can test positive up to 3 months without having symptoms. Since I do not work outside my house, there’s no real imperative reason to get tested although inquiring minds would like to know my status. Such as my parents, who both have tested positive and my father who spent some time in the hospital with COVID-pneumonia. Thankfully, he was treated and released. We could not have asked for a better outcome with that for him, given his age of 84 and health issues. I decided that the Croatian people are strong.
Having survived COVID-19 should make me happy and in many ways I am happy. I am also profoundly grateful that nothing went wrong and that I managed to fight the illness at home and not have to go to the hospital. Two rounds of antibiotics for bronchitis that threatened to become pneumonia and a relentless fever as well as the fatigue, that even now cripples me, and yet I managed to fight it at home. It wasn’t easy and at times it was downright scary. The headaches, nausea, the coughing that scared me and the fever that left me freezing all night were things that I debated on going to the hospital for. Instead, I chose to battle it at home more concerned that the hospital was a worse place than my bed and that I would be taking a much-needed bed from someone who really and truly needed it. I purchased a pulse oximeter on the recommendation of my doctor and kept track of my oxygen. Had it dropped too low, I would have taken myself to the hospital, but it never did. The lowest it went was 92 and that was when I used my asthma inhaler and my diffuser with eucalyptus and peppermint essential oil to help with my breathing. I was lucky that it was enough to help.
However, I am still dealing with the repercussions of having COVID. I am still dealing with the symptoms and like everyone else touched by this disease, I do not know the long-term effects, especially on my other health issues/autoimmune disorders. I am worried about the long-term effects and what it might be doing to my body that I do not yet know about. The main thing I am dealing with at the moment is epic fatigue. I have dealt with fatigue before COVID, because of my autoimmune disorders, but this fatigue leaves them all in the dust. I sleep late, I nap all the time and I go to sleep early. I feel like I can’t get anything done because I’m sleepy all the time and my brain is fuzzy. It sucks. Big time.


If you get COVID here are my 5 Tips:


Stay Hydrated: It’s so important to keep drinking water, herbal teas, ginger-ale or Gatorade or Vitamin Water. Being sick can naturally wreak some havoc on our bodies and then add symptoms like a fever and cough and these can rob the body of nutrients you need to get better. Our body is made of 60% water. It’s only natural to want to replenish that water and electrolytes if you have other symptoms like diarrhoea or nausea and vomiting. Hydration is important in keeping our core temperature balanced and being dehydrated can make a fever worse. Remember, water can come from fruits, soups, teas and popsicles if you aren’t feeling like drinking a whole glass of water. Just getting a little bit in is better than nothing at all.


Pain medication/fever reducer: Make sure you have this on hand right next to you at all times and are taking it as directed, every 4hrs or so. My fever was notorious for disappearing during the day and raging at night. We researched why and it has to do with the amount of cortisol in your body that elevates at night and causes the white blood count to rise. So the illness is being fought by the white blood cells at night which causes you to run a temperature and feel miserable. I was like this straight for a week, just freezing at night and going crazy. Tylenol is your best bet, there is something in Advil and Motrin they advise against taking while you have COVID.


Ice packs: These are a life savour for both the headaches of COVID and the reducing fever. I used about three at a time. One for my head and one under my neck and back to help with the fever. It is not pleasant when you are freezing with 101.5, but it helps bring the fever down in combination with the Tylenol and ultimately you end up sleeping better. Keep several around if you can or use some old veggie bags. They will help in a pinch and you can replace them.


Thermometer: You need to take your temperature regularly because every time you run a fever you need to continue to self-isolate. Once you have not run a temperature for 24-36 hrs., you are considered no longer infectious and even if you are still exhibiting symptoms, you can go out with a face mask. So, please take your temperature regularly so that you can both treat yourself, and monitor your progress.


Vitamin C, Turmeric and Ginger: Turmeric and ginger have incredible anti-inflammatory properties and are high in anti-oxidants. Ginger can help fight off colds and relieves stomach related issues. Vitamin C supports our immune cells and in combination with a diet rich in fresh fruit and veggies will protect the body from foreign invasions.

We’ve Been Infiltrated

Five days ago, my youngest started to not feel well. She, like my oldest and myself has an autoimmune disorder. Hers is newly diagnosed and while she hasn’t had too many symptoms from it [lupus] she also has fibromyalgia and scoliosis, which can leave her feeling kind of crummy and achy. Her symptoms were vague and we chalked them up to chronic illness and being run down. However, on the third day when she came home from work and told me that the previous night, she’d been running a temperature, my heart seized with fear and I knew it was more than just a chronic illness flare up in combination with her symptoms. She went to the clinic and tested positive for COVID-19.

She has been quarantined to her room. Her sister, whom she shares tht room with, has been moved to my bedroom during the day and on the couch at night when I try to sleep in my bedroom at night. It’s been complicated because during all this we’ve had other issues going on.

We have an older dog who just recently tore his ACL on his back, rear hind leg and then a few days later partially tore the right leg. We’ve been acting as a trauma unit and a day care center for our dog and trying to manage keeping him and our puppy separated, which has not been an easy task. By the way, if any of my lovely readers know of any ingenious ways to keep an 8-month-old puppy busy while in quarantine, while having to be separated from an injured dog, and keeping said injured dog busy and entertained while he can’t move around, I’m all ears! This has been brutal.

I feel like when my husband goes on deployment that everything that can go wrong does go wrong and that this particular deployment has been the king of all deployments when it comes to things breaking, falling apart, people getting sick and things going wrong. I knew in my head with 3 working children that if someone were to be exposed to COVID at work, it was only a matter of time before one of my kids got sick. And should they get sick, then my chances of getting sick is exponentially higher. I don’t have a lot of places to hide in my house.

It’s been a day since I started writing this and I’ve tested positive. No surprise. My head hurts, my body hurts, and I’m exhausted on top of the normal exhaustion I feel as a chronic illness patient. I can’t even describe it. And the head pain. Like the worst migraine ever that just won’t go away and only sleep relieves it. My asthma has been wonky and I’ve been coughing but so far, aside from a little wheezing, lungs are clear on x-ray. Now, it’s just a matter of time and patience in the healing department and worry that I’m going to have some long-term effects because of my chronic illness. You keeping hearing about these “long-haulers” and I worry that this illness will leave an impression on me. I worry because of my vulnerability. Chronic illness has already scarred my body in so many ways; gouged out deep marks leaving me to never be the same again. It’s a heavy burden and because there’s so little that we know about COVID, I can’t help but worry about my future. What I do know, is when that vaccine comes out, I’m going to be first in line so there’s no chance of getting this again. 

To those of you out there still fighting the fight, be vigilant! Wear your mask, wash your hands, protect your love ones. But if you do get sick don’t despair. My daughter felt very guilty when I got sick, as though it was her fault. Once this virus infiltrates your household it’s game-over. Everyone is exposed. Not everyone may succumb to getting sick, but everyone is exposed. This virus is everywhere and you can’t predict who you might come into contact with, where. It’s no one’s fault. It’s just the virus’ fault. Be safe.

New Way of Life

I woke up this morning knowing that I have my weekly response paper of 500+ words and my final of 2+ pages to write for my summer class to write for my summer class by June 30th, but this is boiling inside of me as well. I live in Houston, Texas; a city that’s wildly, spiking in COVID-19 patients, to the point that our Texas Children’s Hospital has opened up its ICU to allow adult patients.

I have a complicated view of this decision. I applaud Texas Children’s for opening up their doors for COVID-19 patient’s because if all other beds are full, where are they going to go? On the other hand, I know Texas Children’s very well. My 23-year-old spent nearly 3 months there being premature, born at 28 weeks and weighing only 2lbs. I know there are cancer patients there. Heart patients there. Patients who’ve had organ transplants or are waiting for transplants. Texas Children’s Hospital care for the most vulnerable patients of Houston, and Texas and of the world, because people travel from all over the state and the world to Houston to receive the excellent treatment from the most knowledgeable doctors we have there. I don’t want to put any of those children or doctor’s in danger.

On the hand, I don’t know who made the decision to open Texas Children to COVID-19 patients. Was it Governor Abbott? Mayor Turner? Was it Texas Children’s Hospital? If it was a collective decision that the hospital was a part of? I hope it was the latter because we’ve seen in New York that hospitals are not immune to spreading this virus. The last place that needs to see an explosion of the virus is this hospital. It’s frustrating as a citizen to see this happening, knowing maybe it could’ve been prevented. Our County Judge Lina Hidalgo implored people to wear masks a month ago, but Governor Abbott snidely called her a radical. Meanwhile, as I sit here on my couch recovering from surgery, having been a virtual hermit since May, all I can think is, “Radical? Is that what we now call people who are looking out for the health and safety of others?” Guess I am a radical. I’ll wear that proudly.

Moving on to my point of this post as my time is quickly running out- yes I’m on a timer! We often here the phrase “new normal,” but I think the only way we can handle this virus, especially upon hearing that the antibodies may only last a couple months, is looking at this as a New Way of Life, not just a “new normal.” In my opinion, the way I’ve heard a “new normal expressed,” I think can be interpreted by some, as something transient and something that can go “back to normal.” I think things need to be expressed in a more finite way. This is the way things are. This is the “New Way of Life.” Cut the cord of any expectation of things going back to normal. I don’t think we can fight this monster of COVID-19 and win, if we don’t change our life habits completely and never look back. I think masks are going to be a permanent part of our life until a vaccine is created that works, and works for more than 3-6 months. I think hand washing is a vital part of cleanliness and in protecting yourself from COVID-19, just the same as social distancing.

Our New Way of Life isn’t something that will be easy and isn’t something that will be like by all. It’s the nature of “new things.” But as Americans, it’s also our nature to come together and support each other during dark times, throwing aside differing views for one common goal, in this case- Annihilation of COVID-19! Whenever it becomes difficult- whenever it becomes frustrating to wear your mask or social distance, remember that. Remember the common cause. Remember who you are protecting.

Stay Home. Stay Safe.